Articles

12 November 1944

12 November 1944


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

12 November 1944

November

1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930
>December

War at Sea/ War in the Air

RAF Lancasters sink the Tirpitz in Tromso Fjord

War at Sea

Royal Navy sinks ten ships in a German convoy

Germany

Himmler reads out Hitler's speach at the "beer-hall putsch" celebrations in Munich



The 442nd Regiment were a combat team that were composed almost entirely of second-generation American soldiers of Japanese ancestry (Nisei), who fought in World War II. The picture shows the 442nd being honoured after rescuing "The Lost Battalion" in France. 12th November, 1944. (2322x1852).

Some of them volunteered while they where in the internment camps, or had family in the internment camps.

The 442nd is the most decorated unit for its size in US Army History. 21 Medals of Honor. 4,000 Purlple Hearts and 4,000 Bronze Stars. All total the unit earned over 18,000 medals (over its history some 14,000 men served in the unit). They also recvɽ several Allied decorations/commendations.

And this while the US held their families in the internment camps.

Plus the Japanese American families lost their homes and businesses when they were put into camps. After the war, when they came out of the camps, many had nothing.

As he raised himself up and cocked his arm to throw his last grenade, a German soldier inside the bunker fired a rifle grenade, which struck his right elbow, nearly severing most of his arm and leaving his primed grenade reflexively "clenched in a fist that suddenly didn't belong to me anymore". Inouye's horrified soldiers moved to his aid, but he shouted for them to keep back out of fear his severed fist would involuntarily relax and drop the grenade. While the German inside the bunker reloaded his rifle, Inouye pried the live grenade from his useless right hand and transferred it to his left. As the enemy soldier aimed his rifle at him, Inouye tossed the grenade into the bunker and destroyed it. He stumbled to his feet and continued forward, silencing the last German resistance with a one-handed burst from his Thompson before being wounded in the leg and tumbling unconscious to the bottom of the ridge. He awoke to see the worried men of his platoon hovering over him. His only comment before being carried away was to order them back to their positions, saying "nobody called off the war!"

and then see online images of folks attacking Asian-Americans at random. and i get really upset.


Plane crashes in Rockaway, New York

An American Airlines flight out of John F. Kennedy (JFK) Airport in New York City crashes into a Queens neighborhood after takeoff on November 12, 2001, killing 265 people. Although some initially speculated that the crash was the result of terrorism, as it came exactly two months after the September 11 attacks, the cause was quickly proven to be a combination of pilot error and wind conditions.

Flight 587 took off at 9:14 a.m., bound for the Dominican Republic with 260 passengers and crew on board. Just ahead of the Airbus 300 jet, also using runway 31, was a Japan Air 747. Even with the standard four-mile distance between them, the 747 created some wake turbulence that hit Flight 587 just minutes after takeoff. As the plane climbed to 13,000 feet, there were two significant shudders and then a violent heave.

Unfortunately, the pilots of Flight 587 overreacted to the wake turbulence and their subsequent maneuvers put too much strain on the tail section of the plane. The tail, along with the rudder in the rear, broke off completely and fell into Rockaway Bay. Without this part of the plane, Flight 587 crashed to the ground.

As Flight 587 was in its final moments, Kevin McKeon was in his house on Queens’ Rockaway Peninsula. In an instant, his house virtually exploded he was thrown out into his yard as the plane fell onto his house. In all, 10 homes were set ablaze, and five people on the ground, as well as all 260 people on the plane, lost their lives. The disaster hit Rockaway especially hard, as the community was still reeling from the September 11 attacks, in which 65 area residents lost their lives.


612 Ordnance Base Armament Maintanance Battalion stayed at Warminster Wiltshire on 12 november 1944

The 612 Ordnance Base Armament Maintanance Battalion is one of the units on the UK Station List made by Mr. Grinton. This and other records on Back to Normandy was compiled from Headquarters, European Theater of Operations, Kingdom Station List, and dated 7 September 1944.
(-) minus sign behind a unit name indicates that part of the unit was elsewhere.
Counties are mentioned as the so called pre-1974 British counties. The map co-ordinates are automatically made with Google Maps. If you have a more accurate location, photos, stories or links, please sent your information to Back to Normandy. The unit is also know as member of the US Army, Army Air Force. In this period, around this date of 12 november 1944 the 612 Ordnance Base Armament Maintanance Battalion were here in Warminster, Wiltshire.

The original station list was obtained from the National Archives & Records Administration (NARA) at College Park, Maryland. The NARA describe it as HQ/ETO Station List, 4/30/44 and reference Box 15, 270/48/32/2. In the European and Mediterranean theater the US Army had 3.5 million troops there. About 1.7 million were combat troops and around 700.000 were service troops along with 592.000 army air force troops and the rest were replacements, patients, overhead and staff. The correct count of support- and line troops in this context is difficult.


HistoryLink.org

On November 12, 1896, Buffalo Soldier Moses Williams (1845-1899) receives the Medal of Honor 15 years after his heroic action in a battle with the Warm Springs Apaches in New Mexico on August 16, 1881. Williams was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in the United States Colored Troops. In 1866, with the formation of four peacetime black regiments, he was able to become a regular army soldier. Williams joined the black Ninth Cavalry, and in 1886 became one of the first black ordnance sergeants. At the time he receives the Medal of Honor he is serving as ordnance sergeant at Fort Stevens, Oregon, which he will do until his retirement to Vancouver, Washington, in 1898. Sergeant Williams will die in Vancouver in 1899 and will be buried in the Vancouver Barracks Cemetery.

Joining the Black Cavalry

On July 28, 1866, the United States Congress passed the Army Reorganization Act that created four regiments of black soldiers: two infantry regiments, the Twenty-Fourth and Twenty-Fifth, and two cavalry regiments, the Ninth and Tenth. These regiments offered blacks economic and social advancement not otherwise obtainable in post-Civil War society. They also provided an opportunity to continue service for black soldiers who had served in the Civil War as volunteers or in United States Colored Troops units.

One of these soldiers was Moses Williams from Vicksburg, Mississippi. Moses enlisted in October 1864 in the Third Cavalry Regiment, which fought in a number of engagements. Moses Williams had reached the rank of corporal by the time the Third was mustered out on January 26, 1966, and he returned to Vicksburg. When the black cavalry was formed in 1866 he went to Carrolton, Louisiana, the headquarters of the Ninth Cavalry, and joined. Once formed, the Ninth Cavalry went to San Antonio for training. Following their training, the Ninth was assigned to west-Texas posts.

Moses Williams and other cavalrymen who could not read or write took evening classes to become literate. Williams also studied mathematics, which would later enable him to become an ordnance sergeant. He learned quickly and with hard work was promoted to first sergeant in 1868. The Ninth Cavalry protected the stage route between San Antonio and El Paso, Texas. In 1875 the Ninth was sent to New Mexico and Williams made first sergeant of Company I.

Valor in the Indian Wars

The Ninth Cavalry was dispatched to New Mexico to subdue the Warm Springs Apaches. Black units such as the Ninth played a major role on the Western frontier. Although the etymology is uncertain, the term "buffalo soldier" was applied to them. Indians are said to have used the term out of respect and comparing their curly hair to that of Bison. The Warm Springs Apaches were rebelling against the concentration policy and white greed. They attacked settlers and fought the army, with battles going on from 1875 to 1881.

In August 1881, Company I was camped at Canada Alamosa, New Mexico. On August 16, 1881, the company learned that a settler family nearby had been murdered. A detachment of 15 troopers and several Mexican soldiers immediately saddled up and rode to the ranch. Additional I Company troops followed a short time later. At the ranch the bodies of a woman and three children were discovered. The trail of the Warm Spring Apaches was easily detected and followed into the Cuchillo Negro Mountain foothills. Led by the elderly and highly skilled warrior Nana, or Kas-tziden (ca.1800-ca.1896), the Warm Spring Apache forces had taken up positions behind boulders and in crevices above the trail. At the foothills the cavalrymen rode into a trap and lost a number of horses and had troop casualties. The I Company detachment tried flanking to dislodge the attackers. First Sergeant Moses Williams led a group on the right flank pursuing the attack force as Mexican soldiers on the left also gave chase.

There was a running battle as the cavalry chased the Warm Spring Apache forces. The cavalrymen were unable to overcome them, so a retreat was ordered. Four troopers did not hear the retreat order and found themselves in danger of being surrounded and killed. Sergeant Williams, his lieutenant, and another cavalryman rushed in to save them. Two of the troopers were wounded and carried out while Williams and two others laid down a barrage of fire to protect their escape. The battles continued to nightfall when Nana and his men escaped. Williams's bravery, coolness under attack, and his devotion to duty were recorded in his Medal of Honor citation.

Coming to the Pacific Northwest

In 1886, Sergeant Williams successfully passed an examination by a board of officers and became one of the first black ordnance sergeants. With the new position he was responsible for the arms and ammunition of a post and their upkeep and repair. The ordnance sergeant had to make regular inventories and reports submitted to higher headquarters. Ordnance Sergeant Williams's first duty station was Fort Buford, North Dakota. He served as the fort ordnance sergeant until the post closed in 1895.

In March 1895, Ordnance Sergeant Williams was assigned to Fort Stevens in Oregon. A detachment of 20 men was at the closed coastal defense post at the mouth of the Columbia River maintaining the installation. Sergeant Williams was in charge of the maintenance of the coastal defense guns. While stationed here he was involved in the installation of additional coastal defense guns.

On November 12, 1896, during his tour at Fort Stevens, he received the Medal of Honor for his actions 15 years earlier.

He retired on May 12, 1898, to a cabin outside Vancouver, Washington. On August 23, 1899, he died there of heart failure. A search of his belongings turned up the Medal of Honor.

He was buried in the Vancouver Barracks Post Cemetery. He is one of four Medal of Honor recipients buried there, along with Sergeant James Madison Hill (1845-1919), Major William Wallace McCammon (1838-1903), and Private Herman Pfisterer (1866-1905). A monument to these four Medal of Honor recipients, located at Vancouver Barracks, was dedicated by Secretary of State Colin Powell (b. 1937) in 1991.

Cultural Resources Program, Joint Base Lewis-McChord

Sergeant Moses Williams (1845-1899)

Courtesy United States Army

Grave marker, Moses Williams (1845-1899), Vancouver Barracks Post Cemetery, Clark County, n.d.

Sources:

Donald K. and Helen L. Ross, Washington State Men of Valor (Burley, Washington: Coffee Break Press, 1980) William H. Leckie, The Buffalo Soldiers: A Narrative of the Negro Cavalry in the West (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1967) Irvin H. Lee, Negro Medal of Honor Men (New York: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1967) "Colored Veteran Dead," Morning Olympian, August 25, 1899, p. 1 "Moses Williams, Army," The Oregonian, August 27, 1899, p. A-9.


World War II Database

Did you enjoy this photograph or find this photograph helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this photograph with your friends:

Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Bill says:
23 Sep 2011 08:38:35 PM

HELMUT, REMEMBER USING SHOVELS TO DIG THOSE TRENCHES, JA! HERMAN AND NOW WERE GOING TO FILL THEM!

2. ari says:
12 Jan 2012 06:35:37 AM

If I were volksturmm, my weapon of choices is panzerfaust and a MP 40.

3. Bill says:
9 Oct 2016 06:19:50 PM

One way to der front the last parade. Volkssturm units were made up of young boys and old men. Photo taken in Berlin, November 1944.

During the final four months of WWII in Europe, over 1,230,000 men were killed in action losses were Wehrmacht, SS, Hitler Youth and Volkssturm units. That's about 300,000 a month this doesn't count Wounded in Action, Missing or taken POW.
Looking at the photo those men are all dressed well marching off to their fate.
Most are armed with the Panzerfaust anti-tank weapon, w/a mix of K98's or other types of rifles, a few are carrying the MG 34 7.92mm machine gun.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


This Day In History: US B-29s Bomb Tokyo (1944)

On this day in 1944, the US air force launched a massive bombing raid on the Japanese Capital, Tokyo. It was to be the first of the many massive raids that were designed to destroy the Japanese War Machine that year. The raids involved over 100 giant U.S. B-29 Superfortress bombers. The target of the raid was a huge industrial complex that manufactured engines for fighter planes.

The raid began after a reconnaissance mission was flown by a B-29. This mission photographed many sites, around Tokyo and they identified the location of the factories that were supplying the Japanese air force with engines. The reconnaissance mission took over 500 images of Tokyo and this allowed the planners to identify and locate the targets for the raid. There were a series of small raids conducted over Tokyo that were aimed at some of the targets identified in the reconnaissance mission. On this day in 1944, the Americans ordered a massive raid on Tokyo, their most ambitious one since 1942. Prior to the raid, the Americans had extensively bombed airfields on the island of Iwo Jima to destroy Zero fighters. The fighters on Iwo Jima were crucial for the air defense strategy of the Japanese air force. This allowed the B-27 to safely fly to their target- Tokyo, the heart of Imperial Japan. The raid was led by General. Emmett O&rsquoDonnell, piloting a B-27 known as Dauntless Dotty. The raid made it safely to Tokyo and they were not attacked by any Zeroes. The B-27s flew at a great height to avoid anti-aircraft fire. They dropped hundreds of tons of explosives and caused great devastation. However, only a couple of dozen of the bombs hit their main target, which was the aircraft engine facilities. There was little damage inflicted on the site. More bombs fell on the areas around the site that actually on the target. An unknown number of Japanese were killed and injured. However, the Japanese were not able to inflict much damage on the raiders and they only lost one bomber. One of the commanders of the B-29 received a Distinguished Flying Cross for his role in the raid. The raid was the first large-scale raid on Tokyo since the ill-fated Doolittle Raid and it demonstrated the growing capabilities of the US bombers and their pilots.

The devastation in Tokyo after air raids (1945)

The Japanese government was furious over the raid as it showed the civilian population that not even the Home Islands were safe from the Americans. However, they could do little about the raids and they became more intense in the weeks and the months following. Unknown thousands were to die in these bombing raids.


Gloucestershire Regiment during WW1

Since 1815 the balance of power in Europe had been maintained by a series of treaties. In 1888 Wilhelm II was crowned ‘German Emperor and King of Prussia’ and moved from a policy of maintaining the status quo to a more aggressive position. He did not renew a treaty with Russia, aligned Germany with the declining Austro-Hungarian Empire and started to build a Navy rivalling that of Britain. These actions greatly concerned Germany’s neighbours, who quickly forged new treaties and alliances in the event of war. On 28th June 1914 Franz Ferdinand the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was assassinated by the Bosnian-Serb nationalist group Young Bosnia who wanted pan-Serbian independence. Franz Joseph's the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (with the backing of Germany) responded aggressively, presenting Serbia with an intentionally unacceptable ultimatum, to provoke Serbia into war. Serbia agreed to 8 of the 10 terms and on the 28th July 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, producing a cascade effect across Europe. Russia bound by treaty to Serbia declared war with Austro-Hungary, Germany declared war with Russia and France declared war with Germany. Germany’s army crossed into neutral Belgium in order to reach Paris, forcing Britain to declare war with Germany (due to the Treaty of London (1839) whereby Britain agreed to defend Belgium in the event of invasion). By the 4th August 1914 Britain and much of Europe were pulled into a war which would last 1,566 days, cost 8,528,831 lives and 28,938,073 casualties or missing on both sides.

The Regiment raised a total of 25 battalions and was awarded 72 Battle Honours, 4 Victoria Crosses and lost 8,100 men during the course of the war.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Bordon, Hampshire as part of the 3rd Brigade of the 1st Division.
13.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre where the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, First Battle of Ypres.
During 1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The Battle of Aubers, The Battle of Loos.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Fresnoy-le-Grand.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Tientsin, China at the outbreak of war. Set sail for the UK.
08.11.1914 Landed in Southampton then moved to Winchester and joined the 81st Brigade of the 27th Division.
18.12.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1915
The action of St Eloi, The Second Battle of Ypres.
Nov 1915 Moved to Salonika landing by 12.12.1915 and engaged in various actions against the Bulgarian Army including The capture of Karajakois and Yenikoi, the battle of Tumbitza Farm.
03.11.1916 Transferred to the 82nd Brigade of the same Division and continued to engaged in various actions including
During 1917
The capture of Homondos
During 1918
The final offensive in Salonika, The capture of the Roche Noir Salient, The passage of the Vardar River and pursuit to the Strumica valley.

3rd (Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Bristol and then moved to Abbey Wood, Woolwich.
May 1915 Moved to Gravesend and on to Sittingbourne where it remained until the end of the war.

1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion Territorial Force and 1/6th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Both stationed at Bristol as part of the Gloucester and Worcester Brigade of the South Midland Division.
Aug 1916 Moved to Swindon and then on to Essex.
30.03.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne where the formation became the 144th Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the resistance and engaged in various actions including The fighting on the Asiago Plateau and The Battle of the Vittoria Veneto.
04.11.1918 The 1/4th ended the war in Austria, Baselge de Pine N.E. of Trent and the 1/6th ended the war Cire, east of Trent.

1/5th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Gloucester as part of the Gloucester and Worcester Brigade of the South Midland Division.
Aug 1914 Moved to the war station on the Isle of Wight and then moved to Swindon and then on to Chelmsford.
29.03.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne where the formation became the 144th Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the resistance and engaged in various actions including The fighting on the Asiago Plateau.
11.09.1918 Left the 48th Division and returned to France and joined the 75th Brigade of the 25th Division which engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Pursuit to and Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Preux north of Landrecies.

2/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion Territorial Force and 2/6th Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Both formed in Bristol and then moved to Northampton to join the 183rd Brigade of the 61st Division.
April 1915 Moved to Chelmsford.
Feb 1916 Moved to Salisbury Plain.
24.05.1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1916
The Attack at Fromelles.
During 1917
The Operations on the Ancre, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Cambrai Operations.
20.02.1918 Disbanded in France.

2/5th Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed in Gloucester and then moved to Northampton to join the 184th Brigade of the 61st Division.
April 1915 Moved to Chelmsford.
Feb 1916 Moved to Tidworth.
24.05.1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1916
The Attack at Fromelles.
During 1917
The Operations on the Ancre, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Cambrai Operations.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Maresches south of Valenciennes.

3/4th 3/5th 3/6th Battalion Territorial Force
1915 All formed and wintered at Weston-super-Mare.
08.04.1916 Became the 4th 5th and 6th Reserve Battalions as part of the South Midlands Reserve Brigade Territorial Force and moved to Cheltenham.
Mar 1917 Moved to Catterick and then Horton, Northumberland.
Oct 1917 Moved to Seaton Delaval.

7th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the First New Army (K1) and joined the 39th Brigade of the 13th Division and then moved to Tidworth.
Jan 1915 Moved to Basingstoke and then on to Blackdown, Aldershot.
Jun 1915 Mobilised for war and embarked at Avonmouth for Gallipoli.
July 1915 Landed at Gallipoli and engaged in various actions including The Battle of Sari Bair, The Battle of Russell's Top, The Battle of Hill 60.
Jan 1916 Evacuated to Egypt due to heavy losses from combat, disease and severe weather and defended the Suez Canal.
Feb 1916 Moved to Mesopotamia to defend British interests in the area and engaged in various actions against the Ottoman Empire including
During 1917
The Battle of Kut al Amara, The capture of the Hai Salient, The capture of Dahra Bend, The passage of the Diyala, capture of Bagdad, The Second and Third Actions of Jabal Hamrin and Tuz Khurmatli.
July 1918 Transferred to the 39th Brigade of the North Persian Force.
31.10.1918 Ended the war in North Persia, Bijar.

8th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the Second New Army (K2) and joined the 57th Brigade of the 19th Division and then moved to Perham Down.
Mar 1915 Moved to Tidworth.
18.07.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1915
The Action of Pietre.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, west of Bavai.

9th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the Third New Army (K3) and joined the 78th Brigade of the 26th Division and then moved to Cheltenham.
April 1915 Moved to Longbridge Deverill.
21.09.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France.
Nov 1915 Moved to Salonika to strengthen Serbian resistance against the Bulgarian forces and engaged in various actions including
During 1916
The Battle of Horseshoe Hill.
During 1917
The Battles of Doiran.
04.07.1918 Left the 26th Division and returned to France arriving at Serqueux 17.07.1918 and joined the 198th Brigade of the 66th Division.
22.09.1918 Became a Pioneer Battalion and the Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
The Battle of Cambrai, The Pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, east of Avesnes.

10th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the Third New Army (K3) and joined the 26th Division and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
Nov 1914 Moved to Cheltenham and then back to Salisbury Plain April 1915.
08.08.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and joined the 1st Brigade of the 1st Division which engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1915
The Battle of Loos
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
14.02.1918 Disbanded in France and personnel transferred to the 13th Entrenching Battalion.

11th (Reserve) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed as a service battalion of the Fourth New Army (K4) at Abbey Wood, Woolwich and joined the 106th Brigade of the 35th Division.
Nov 1914 Moved to Cheltenham.
10.04.1915 Became the 2nd Reserve Battalion and then moved to Belhus Park, Essex.
Sept 1915 Moved to Seaforth as part of the 4th Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 16th Training Reserve Battalion of the 4th Reserve brigade.

12th (Service) Battalion (Bristol)
30.08.1914 Formed by the Citizens’ Recruiting Committee in Bristol.
June 1915 Moved to Wensley Dale to join the 95th Brigade of the 32nd Division.
23.06.1915 Taken over by the war office and moved to Salisbury Plain.
21.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France.
26.12.1915 Transferred to the 95th Brigade of the 5th Division which engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1916
The Attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The Battle of Vimy, The Attack on La Coulotte, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian resistance.
April 1918 Returned to France and once again engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1918
The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of the Epehy, The Battle of the Canal du Nord.
19.10.1918 Disbanded in France.

13th (Service) Battalion (Forest of Dean) (Pioneers)
Dec 1914 Formed at Malvern by Lieutenant Colonel H Webb, MP.
12.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Winchester as a Pioneer Battalion of the 39th Division.
Sept 1915 Moved to Aldershot.
03.03.1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1916
An attack near Richebourg l'Avoue, The fighting on the Ancre, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The actions at the Somme crossings, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Rosieres, The fighting on Wytschaete Ridge, The First and Second Battles of Kemmel, The Battle of the Scherpenberg.
06.05.1918 Reduced to training cadre and transferred to the 66th Division.
20.09.1918 Defending the Lines of Communication in the 197th Brigade.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, near Aumale.

14th (Service) Battalion (West of England)
22.04.1915 Formed as a bantam battalion by the Citizens’ Recruiting Committee in Bristol.
June 1915 Moved to Masham, Yorkshire as part of the 105th Brigade of the 35th Division.
23.06.1915 Taken over by the War Office and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
30.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including
During 1916
The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The fighting for Arrow Head Copse and Maltz Horn Farm, The fighting for Falfemont Farm.
During 1917
The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The fighting in Houthulst Forest, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Tieghem.
11.02.1918 Disbanded in France 12 Officers and 250 men transferred to the 13th Battalion.

15th (Reserve) Battalion
Aug 1915 Formed at Sutton Coldfield as a local reserve battalion, from the depot companies of the 12th and 14th battalions and then moved to Chisledon as part of the 22nd Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 93rd Training Reserve Battalion.

16th (Reserve) Battalion
Nov 1915 Formed at Chisledon as a local reserve battalion, from the depot company of the 13th battalion as part of the 22nd Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 94th Training Reserve Battalion.

17th Battalion Territorial Force
01.01.1917 Formed at Walton-on-the-Naze from the 82nd provisional Battalion as part of the 226th Brigade.
Mar 1917 Moved to Clacton where it remained until the end of the war.


Two color guards and color bearers of the Japanese-American 100th Battalion, 442d Combat Team, stand at attention, while their citations are read. They are standing on ground in the Bruyères area, France, where many of their comrades fell. November 12 1944

Two color guards and color bearers of the Japanese-American 100th Battalion, 442d Combat Team, stand at attention, while their citations are read. They are standing on ground in the Bruyères area, France, where many of their comrades fell. November 12 1944

(Bruyères is a commune in the Vosges department in Lorraine in northeastern France)

Through a series of costly battles—first in Italy, then in France—the 442nd Regimental Combat Team would become the most highly decorated unit of its size and length of service in the history of the U.S. Army, receiving an unprecedented 8 Presidential Unit Citations, 21 Medals of Honor, and 9,486 Purple Hearts.

The 4,000 men of the team who first went into action in 1943 had to be replaced three and a half times to make up for those who were killed, wounded, and missing in action. They helped win Japanese Americans’ personal battle as well, proving that their loyalty to the United States was beyond question. On July 15, 1946, the survivors of the 442nd marched down Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C., becoming the first military unit returning from the war to be reviewed by President Harry S. Truman. “You fought not only the enemy,” President Truman told them that day, “you fought prejudice, and you have won.”

Thank you to Doug Banks from WW2 Colourised photos for the caption.

Photo taken by US Signal Corps

Digital copy provided by the US Army

Thanks for posting, my grandfather was in the 442nd and I like to think he's pictured here somewhere in the blurred back.

wow! Has there been a movie about them? A series?

One of the regiments best known members was the late Senator Daniel Inouye who lost his arm in combat and proceeded to react in the most Hollywood way imaginable:

As his squad distracted the third machine gunner, Inouye crawled toward the final bunker, coming within 10 yards. As he raised himself up and cocked his arm to throw his last grenade, a German soldier inside the bunker fired a rifle grenade, which struck his right elbow, nearly severing most of his arm and leaving his primed grenade reflexively "clenched in a fist that suddenly didn't belong to me anymore". Inouye's horrified soldiers moved to his aid, but he shouted for them to keep back out of fear his severed fist would involuntarily relax and drop the grenade.

While the German inside the bunker reloaded his rifle, Inouye pried the live grenade from his useless right hand and transferred it to his left. As the enemy soldier aimed his rifle at him, Inouye tossed the grenade into the bunker and destroyed it. He stumbled to his feet and continued forward, silencing the last German resistance with a one-handed burst from his Thompson before being wounded in the leg and tumbling unconscious to the bottom of the ridge. He awoke to see the worried men of his platoon hovering over him. His only comment before being carried away was to order them back to their positions, saying "Nobody called off the war!"


November 24: ON THIS DAY in 1944, 100 B-29s rip Tokyo in pre-invasion raid

ON THIS DAY IN 1918 , the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Influenza is now the world’s greatest foe. It is more deadly than war itself. The United States Government has found this to be the case. The Bureau of Census, investigating the recent epidemic that swept not only over all of this country, but over most of the entire civilized world, found that deaths in America, properly chargeable to influenza, were far greater in number than deaths from all causes among American troops in the great conflict. Official figures, available from 46 large cities in the country, show that 78,000 persons died as a direct result of the epidemic of influenza. The figures cover the period from September 8 to November 9. The bureau, on the basis of reports received, believes that from 40,000 to 45,000 American boys gave up their lives abroad — this number including those who died from disease or accident as well as those killed or fatally wounded on the battlefields.”

ON THIS DAY IN 1920 , the Eagle reported, “Fire partially destroyed the Sunday school and lecture room of historic Plymouth Church early today, causing a loss of at least $100,000. Many stained glass windows of great value were destroyed together with manuscripts left by the late Henry Ward Beecher. Most of the Beecher relics appear to have been saved, however, although a full inventory of the articles salvaged has not yet been made. The auditorium of the church was so badly damaged that it cannot be completely repaired before September, 1921. The fire did not reach the church proper because of a strong wall separating it from the lecture room. This wall, however, was so weakened as to render use of the auditorium unsafe. How the fire started is a mystery. It is supposed to have been due to defective insulation among wires in the basement but the origin is still a matter of investigation.”

ON THIS DAY IN 1944 , the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — One hundred or more B-29 Superfortresses, officially opening a two-pronged air offensive to soften Japan for invasion, bombed Tokyo by daylight today, and the enemy admitted factories and other important installations had been damaged. Roaring out from new bases on Saipan in the Marianas, 1,550 miles to the southeast, the giant four-engine bombers swept over Tokyo at noon to give the jittery Japanese capital its first taste of American bombs since the historic April 18, 1942 raid by Lt. Gen. James H. Doolittle’s fliers. Four hours later Tokyo belatedly admitted the raid and backed into admissions of what it sought to imply was slight damage to factories and other major installations. ‘Small fires’ were caused, Tokyo broadcasts added, but only among ‘civilian homes and hospitals,’ and all were controlled ‘immediately.’ Tokyo said the bombers, attacking in 10 or more groups, were over the city for two hours. The attack, the first on Tokyo by land-based aircraft, was announced here by Gen. H.H. Arnold, commander of the army air forces and chief of the Global 20th Air Force. He said another communique on damage done to the industrial targets would be issued ‘when further details are available.’”

ON THIS DAY IN 1953 , the Eagle reported, “The long weeks of waiting and guessing are over except for a few hours — the Dodgers are going to announce the name of their new manager today. It was a decision that came suddenly yesterday afternoon to put at rest all the wild rumors. Nearly everybody in baseball who happened to be idle has been a candidate ever since Charley Dressen was let out a week after the conclusion of the World Series. But it is presumed that Walter Alston, who has come up through the organization, until he won the Little World Series from the Yankees’ Kansas City farm last Fall, climaxing a brilliant minor league career, is the logical man. He’s an expert handler of men, has had wide experience and would work at a reasonable wage. But baseball isn’t a game in which the owners can be depended upon to do the logical thing. Walter F. O’Malley, Fresco Thompson and Buzzy Bavasi, the president of the Dodgers and his two veeps, are going around with expressions of Chinese inscrutability on their faces. Any attempt to pump the truth out of them, to beat the gun, leaves them smiling blandly and saying nothing.”


Europe 1920: Treaty of Rapallo

During the Great War, Italy and Serbia had been given conflicting promises of territory by the Allies. When the War ended, Serbia united with other Slavic states to form the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (or Yugoslavia) while Italy occupied the lands it had been promised, many of which had large Slavic populations. Disputes between the two countries, especially over the status of the city of Fiume, led to the 1920 Treaty of Rapallo.

Main Events

11 Aug 1920 Latvian-Soviet Peace Treaty▲

Soviet Russiarecognizes Latvianindependence in wikipedia

22 Aug 1920 Italy withdrawsfrom Albania▲

Italy withdraws
from Albania

14 Oct 1920 Soviet Russiarecognizes Finnishindependence▲

Soviet Russia
recognizes Finnish
independence

18 Oct 1920 Polish counterattack wins Polish-Soviet War▲

After the decisive victory at Warsaw, Poland went back on the offensive. Reaching the Niemen River in September, the Polish Army captured the contested city of Vilnius/Wilno in a brief war with Lithuania, and clashed with the Soviets for the last time. With the Soviets eager to end the war, and the League of Nations pressuring Poland to accept its territorial gains, peace negotiations began. in wikipedia


Watch the video: DIE DEUTSCHE WOCHENSCHAU, NO. 699, 1944 (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Coireail

    I join. It was with me too.

  2. Daimi

    Tomorrow is a new day.

  3. Nixkamich

    I apologize, but I think you are wrong. Write to me in PM, we will handle it.

  4. Narcissus

    Very amusing phrase



Write a message