Articles

The Little Ice Age and Health: Europe from the Early Middle Ages to the Nineteenth Century

The Little Ice Age and Health: Europe from the Early Middle Ages to the Nineteenth Century


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The Little Ice Age and Health: Europe from the Early Middle Ages to the Nineteenth Century

By Richard H. Steckel

Published Online (2010)

Abstract: In recent years economic historians have analyzed data from skeletal remains for insights into long term trends in health. A large project underway in Europe has collected information on stature (from femur length), infections, degenerative joint disease, dental disease, iron/vitamin deficiencies, trauma, and specific diseases such as TB, rickets, and leprosy.

Earlier literature reveals a long-term U-shaped pattern in stature from the early Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. Northern Europeans were remarkably tall during the early Middle Ages, at the height of the Medieval warm period, and did not regain this stature until the turn of the twentieth century, after the little ice age subsided. The minimum occurred near the middle of the seventeenth century, during the coldest period.

This paper analyzes the consequences of climate change on seven measures of health gathered from the remains of 17,250 individuals who lived in Europe at 100 localities from 200 to 1900 A.D, finding that cool temperatures and temperature variability were bad for health. Impacts on the production and distribution of food and lags in making adaptive investments are plausible mechanisms.


Watch the video: Little Ice Age, Part 1: Medieval Meltdown (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Irfan

    I know a site with answers on interesting you a question.

  2. Milford

    I think it's an excellent idea.

  3. Vujas

    You are certainly entitled

  4. Bardolph

    Smiled thanks ...



Write a message